Books I’ve Read Recently

51jhmpyZ8QL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_The Legacy of Luther by Various Authors. One of my favorite figures from church history is Martin Luther. He was truly a unique man that was used by God in massive ways. His life and work continues to impact the way Protestants view their faith and well as how they operate as a faith community. There hasn’t been a shortage of books written about Luther when it comes to both his life and work. This book stands among many other excellent books written about Luther. However, this book is unique in the sense that it allows the reader to take a peak into key areas of Luther’s life and work that other works tend to overlook or don’t spend much time on. For example, there are chapters in this book on Luther’s views on music and preaching, Luther’s family life, and Luther’s later years before his death (which were pretty crazy). The contributors of this book shed light on many fascinating areas of Luther’s life and work that many readers will not get the chance to learn about in other books. I wouldn’t recommend this as the “go to” book on Luther, but would certainly make it one of the top ones out there.

81pgQLuhbzLSing! by Keith and Kristyn Getty. I’ve never read a book on the sole topic of singing. This is one reason I picked up this book to read. However, what I didn’t expect was how much stuff it taught me about singing in just over a 100 pages. It’s a small book that packs a big punch. The reader will learn things like how people were created to sing as well as how we are commanded by God to sing. Readers will also learn about the importance of singing in not only the local church but also in their own personal and family life. There is even helpful bonus sections (called “bonus tracks”) that are written particularly for pastors, worship leaders, and songwriters. This is an excellent little book that I would highly recommend to Christians no matter your place in the local church community.

51jKlmGzSjL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_The Imperfect Disciple by Jared Wilson. One of my favorite authors to read is Jared Wilson. I love his Gospel-centered focus that’s wrapped in a down to earth tone that which makes for both challenging and fun reading. In this book Wilson strives to offer a discipleship manual of sorts that’s for people who “can’t get their act together.” He says, “I tend to think that a lot of ways the evangelical church teaches discipleship seem designed for people who don’t appear to really need it” (page 13). His response then is a book like this where he states: “I want to write a discipleship book for normal people” (page 14). I’d say he accomplishes that goal in this book. This is a book that offers a fresh reminder of God’s grace to people who realize they don’t follow Jesus as well as they want to or should. It’s a book that reminds them of the Gospel instead of giving them self-help action steps to follow. It offers a great reminder of what following Jesus truly means. I’d recommend this book to all Christians.

Two other books I’ve recently read that I chose not to review were The Holiness of God by R.C. Sproul and The Skinny on Communication by Jeff White.

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Book Review: Gospel-Centered Youth Ministry

gospelcenteredym_205_316_90There are a few books I consider “must reads” for people in student ministry (if you want to know what they are ask me). Recently I read a book I would add to that list and it’s called Gospel-Centered Youth Ministry. It’s one of the most theological and practical books I have ever read in regards to student ministry.

One of the strengths of this book is the variety of voices. Every chapter focuses on a different area of student ministry and each chapter is written by someone who has a passion and gifting in that area. Each chapter is written pretty much in the same way – a section on how the Gospel informs and shapes that area of student ministry and a section on how to practically grow in that area of student ministry. Also, at the end of each chapter there is a list of recommended books on the subject of the chapter.

Two of my favorite chapters were Eric McKiddie’s chapter on expositional teaching and Tom Olson’s chapter on singing. All the chapters in this book were excellent but these two were the ones that impacted me the most.

In McKiddie’s chapter, he argues that teaching the Bible is the main task of anyone in student ministry. He says, “While fun is an indispensable part of youth ministry, your main task is to convince your students, week after week, why they need Jesus and to show how the Gospel profoundly after every area of life” (page 55). He believes expositional teaching is the best method for this. After giving his reasons for expositional teaching in student ministry he gives some practical steps in how to craft a Biblical expositional sermon for students. His steps serve as great reminders for people newer to writing sermons as well as to seasoned veterans. Olson’s chapter on singing was another one that I really enjoyed. He argues that corporate worship should be vital a part of student ministry. He says, “It’s not just a warm-up for the message or a means to corral hyperactive teenagers. God has made singing important. Singing is vital for the health of our students and the strength of our ministries and, in harmony with strong teaching, singing will get the word of Christ dwelling richly in their lives” (page 142).

I could say more about these two chapters and the rest of the book but I’d rather you grab a copy and read it for yourself. If you’re in student ministry I’d highly suggest this book for you and your team.