Visit Ministry Downloads

img_0629

Ministry can be very time consuming. Between things like planning, meetings, sermon prep, and training volunteers it can be hard to keep all the plates spinning. One of the benefits of doing ministry in our day is that we have access to a ton of resources online to help us when we lack the time and creativity. There are a host of places online to get ministry resources (some better than others) for almost any area of ministry.

Recently Terrace Crawford launched a new site called Ministry Downloads. The resources on this site are tested, ready-to-go, affordable, and totally downloadable.  There’s something for every church\ministry leader, including (but not limited to): senior pastors, youth leaders, children’s leaders, small group leaders, and more! I’m excited to even have a few of my very own recourse on this site – series on Acts, series on dating, marriage, and sex and a sermon on worry. I’d encourage you to visit this site and grab a few resources for you and your ministry.

Click Here to Visit Ministry Downloads

Advertisements

Book Review: The Pastor’s Justification by Jared Wilson

pastors-justificationThis weekend I finished reading Jared Wilson’s book The Pastor’s Justification. A few years ago I read Wilson’s book Gospel Wakefulness and was deeply impacted and challenged in my own love and excitement for the Gospel of Jesus Christ. So when I saw this book pop up as a recommendation for me on Amazon I knew I had to give it a read. Not only do I enjoy Wilson’s books, I am a sucker for a good pastoral ministry book as I want to always be growing in the pastoral ministry God has placed me in.

Pastoral ministry is a battlefield. Wilson shows us this battle in the introduction of this book with some stats from research done by Barna. I don’t want to give those stats, but let me just say they are sobering and eye opening. It reveals that pastors are working 60 plus hours a week,  have very few friends, feels their families are being neglected, and are underpaid. Not only that, but many feel the temptation to engage in immoral behavior and are discouraged. Wilson says the right response to this battlefield called pastoral ministry is not “timidity or a pity party, but clinging more desperately to the Gospel of Jesus Christ” (page 19). The Gospel is what refreshes, motivates, and keeps pastors in this battle.

Wilson breaks down this book into two parts: The Pastor’s Heart (Chapter 1-6) and The Pastor’s Glory (Chapter 7-11). In part one, Wilson walks through the reader through 1 Peter 5:1-11, which Wilson says is a “helpful Gospel-centered admonition to church leaders” (page 19). As Wilson walks through this passage he helps the reader understand what God calls pastors to do and how they should work on that calling as they shepherd the church God has given them. In part two, Wilson walks through the five “Solas of Reformation” and helps the reader understand how they apply to the pastor and his life.

For the most part I enjoyed this book and it helped me get a better understanding and picture of what Gospel-centered pastoral ministry looks like. The main thing I didn’t like about this book was Wilson’s jabs at other pastors and ministries he obviously disagrees with. Throughout the book it seems as if Wilson is writing with a chip on his shoulder. If the reader is up to date on some of the “hot button” issues and key figures in modern church leadership they will catch these jabs and probably have a good idea of who Wilson is referring to.

Overall, Wilson has written a great book that I believe challenges and brings to light real issues in pastoral ministry. It’s an honest book that is saturated with the Gospel and is relevant to anyone who finds themselves in this glorious yet brutal journey we call pastoral ministry.

Suicide Prevention for Pastors

depressionToo many pastors commit suicide. Most recent is Isaac Hunter who founded the a megachurch called Summit Church in FL. It seems like every few weeks you hear about another pastor taking his own life. Suicide is always shocking, but many people seemed extra shocked when they hear that a pastor committed suicide. Honestly it doesn’t shock me. Being in a pastoral position myself, I understand the frustrations and demands pastors face. However, most people don’t understand what pastors go through on a daily basis. My friend Blake Appleby posted this on Facebook: “Ministry can be brutal. Most people have no clue what ministers battle on a daily basis.” Don’t get me wrong, pastoral ministry is a high calling and it’s an honor to serve Jesus in this way, but the job doesn’t come without many frustrations and struggles. I don’t claim to have all the answers, but I believe there are a few practical things pastors can do to protect themselves from every going down the road of suicide. Pastors don’t wake up one day and decide to take their life, it’s a struggle that usually starts with something “small” and goes unchecked.

Take a day off. This is simple. Pastors need take a day off. Many pastors work long hours Monday throughout Friday and then work again on Sundays. There only day off tends to be Saturday, but that usually gets eaten up by sermon prep or finishing up something that didn’t get finished Friday. Pastors must learn to take a day off and really take it off. Don’t answer e-mails, phone calls, or work on ministry stuff. Take a day off and get away from work the best you can. I’m grateful to work for a church that allows me to take a day off. Pastor, if you don’t take a day off each week, start doing it now. It’s worth it.

Have a hobby outside of ministry. Not only do pastors need to take a day off, they need a hobby and something to do that’s not ministry related on those days off. Many pastors take a day off, but they always end up still working because they don’t have a hobby. Pastor, find a hobby and do it on your day off!

Spend time with your wife. Not always, but many suicide stories I read about pastors seem to always include some type of marriage problem. It may be an affair or may be a marriage that is falling apart for some reason. Pastors need to spend time with their spouse. Instead of bringing more work home with you, turn your computer off (or just leave it at the office!), ignore your cell phone, and spend time with your wife. Watch a movie with her, take her on a date, or jump in bed and have some fun (yes, I just said that, but hey it’s true). I’d recommend pastors read two books related to this point: Date Your Wife by Justin Buzzard and Choosing to Cheat by Andy Stanley.

Accountability. Too many pastors don’t have regular accountability. This is why I believe you hear of so many pastors having moral failures or committing suicide. The Christian life and pastoral ministry are too hard to do alone. Pastors need someone to come along side them to keep them accountable. Someone to ask them the tough questions and make sure they are on the right path. Pastor, if you don’t have an accountability partner, make it a priority to get one as soon as possible!

Have people praying for you. Pastors need to be ok with asking people to pray for them. In fact, Paul asked people to pray for him all the time (Romans 15:30; Ephesians 6:19; 1 Thessalonians 5:25; 2 Thessalonians 3:1). Pastor, find someone or a group of people who will commit to praying for you. Swallow your pride and realize your need for prayer.

These are just a few practical ways I believe pastors can protect themselves from going down any road that may lead to suicide. It’s a serious subject and one we cannot take lightly. What are some ways you think pastors can protect themselves from suicide?

Book Review: Dangerous Calling

Dangerous-Calling-194x300This week I finished the book Dangerous Calling by Paul David Tripp. This book by far has been the most honest, practical, and Gospel-centered pastoral books I have ever read. It does what most pastoral books do not, it’s not a handbook of how to do pastoral ministry in the local church, but an honest look at the heart and man behind the ministry. In Tripp’s words, “This book is written to confront the issue of the often unhealthy shape of pastoral culture and to put on the table the temptations that are either unique to or intensified by pastoral ministry. This is a book of warning that calls you to humble self-reflection and change” (page 11-12).

Tripp breaks down the book into three parts. In part one he examines the pastoral cultural. I appreciate Tripp’s honesty and authenticity in this part of the book (even though he is very honest throughout the entire book). He shares much about his own struggle with personal sin while maintaining the public persona of a healthy pastor. In this section, Tripp exposes many of the struggles and temptations pastors will face. He doesn’t hold any punches, but goes straight to the heart and exposes the sins of pastoral ministry. In part two Tripp talks about the danger of loosing your awe, forgetting who God is. He shares about the danger of being comfortable, keeping secrets, and apathy. In part three he  explains the danger of arrival, forgetting who God is. This is where Tripp exposes the danger and harm in thinking we have arrived or that the ministry is about us, not God.

I don’t want to share much more detail about the contents of this book because I want to encourage anyone in pastoral ministry to pick up a copy and read it for themselves. I have read many pastoral books through college and seminary, but none of them has been has beneficial and helpful as Dangerous Calling. Tripp knows that learning how to do ministry is not the first goal, the goal is to learn how to be the pastor God desires and created you to be. Once you figure that out ministry will happen.

If you read only one book this year pastor, make it this one! You will not regret it and it will change your heart as well as the ministry you oversee. Click here to view a short video of Tripp explaining more about this book.

Tips for Preaching From an iPad

I’ll be honest, one of the reasons I wanted an iPad was to preach from it. Preaching from my iPad is probably the main thing I use my iPad for on a weekly basis. It seems this trend is becoming more popular and you see more and more pastors preaching from an iPad or a tablet. With this new trend comes some opposition as well as much support. At the end of the day, it really doesn’t matter if you preach from an iPad or not. What you preach with or from is not a big deal, it’s the actual preaching itself that is important. But if you do decide to preach from an iPad, here are a few tips that I have learned along the way that may help you:

Don’t make a big deal about it. If you preach from an iPad, don’t make it a point to flash your iPad and make sure everyone in the audience knows you have an iPad. I recommend keeping it on the pulpit or podium so no one sees it while you are preaching. Your iPad is just a tool you are using to share God’s Word, keep your focus on the right thing.Try and keep it out of the audience view as much as possible. More than likely there will be people out there that will get distracted and maybe even jealous when they see you have an iPad.

Use a physical copy of the Bible. If you preach from an iPad, please DO NOT use a Bible app, such as YouVersion, instead of a physical copy of God’s Word. Call me old school, but I think it’s important to preach from an actual copy of the Bible. Use your iPad for your notes, not your Bible. Plus, switching from your notes to a Bible app will be extremely distracting to you and your audience.

Use a good app for your sermon notes. Make sure you have a reliable, easy to use app to have your sermon notes on when you preach. When I preach, I have my sermons on the Dropbox app on my iPad. For me, Dropbox works the best and is easy to get my sermon notes to. After I write my sermon manuscript as a Word doc, I simply drop that Word doc into my Dropbox on my Macbook and then open it up in the Dropbox app on my iPad right before I go up to preach. There are other apps you can use, but I recommend Dropbox.

Try not to look at your iPad too much. This doesn’t just apply to your iPad, but your notes in general. Be so familiar with your sermon content that you don’t need to look at them much as you preach. Stay engaged with your audience and don’t be glued to your notes on your iPad. I try to run through my sermon two times or more before I preach so I will be able to preach and not look down at my notes that much.

These are just a few tips I would share with anyone who is or is thinking about preaching from an iPad. Every good gift comes from God (James 1:17) so use your iPad as a good tool He has given us to expand His kingdom. Use it as a tool to help you preach His Word better and more effectively.

[Question] Do you use an iPad or a tablet when you preach?