Dealing with Sin Teaching Series

Dealing With Sin Social MediaChristians struggle with sin. When someone becomes a Christians they don’t stop struggling with sin. In fact, before someone is a Christian there isn’t really a struggle at all. They are dead in their sins and live in rebellion against God. However, when someone becomes a Christian their sins are forgiven and they receive a new nature (Ephesians 1:7; 2 Corinthians 5:17). This new nature in Christ is what starts the struggle with sin. The old nature remains. Until Christians get to heaven that old nature will still be with them. This old nature is at war with the new nature (Paul shares this struggle in Romans 7). The good news is God has revealed in His Word how Christians can deal with sin. We are not to continue in our sin but strive to put off our old man and put on the new man (Ephesians 4:22-24).

Below you will find a link to a three week teaching series I wrote and taugh on the topic of dealing with sin. In this series, I cover three ways the Bible tells Christians to deal with sin – confession, repentance, and war. Each week focuses on one of these things. This series includes three teaching manuscriptssmall group questions, and the series graphic.

The link below will take you to Download Youth Ministry where you can purchase the entire series or individual messages from this series. While you’re there check out some of the other resources DYM offers.

Click Here to Purchase the Dealing with Sin Series


Note: Please keep in mind this series was originally written for and taught to students. However, it’s a great series for other audiences as well so feel free to tweak it and use it how it best fits your context. I hope this series is a blessing to you and your ministry.

Book Review: Can I Smoke Pot?

pot-draft-cover4-minI’m a big fan of the books Cruciform Press are publishing. They are short and simple as well as usually geared towards relevant issues of our time. Recently I picked up a copy of one of their latest books called Can I Smoke Pot? by Tom Breeden and Mark Ward.

The tagline of this book (“Marijuana in Light of Scriptures”) says it all. In this book, Breeden and Ward use Scripture to discuss the questions many Christians are asking today: Can I smoke pot? Can I use marijuana for medical purposes? The Bible permits drinking alcohol but not drunkness so can I smoke pot as long as I don’t get high? All these questions and more are discussed in this helpful book.

Breeden and Ward start their discussion where the Bible starts – creation. They show the reader that like everything God created, marijuana was created good. However, sin entered into the world and marred God’s good creation. The idea of calling marijuana “good” may be difficult for some Christians but Breeden and Ward rightly add that “respectable, buttoned-down, middle-class, church-attending Western Christians need to say full-throatedly that marijuana is good – or they’ll be betraying Genesis 1 and 2” (page 17). If you stop reading the book at this point you may think the authors are supporting any and all uses of marijuana. This is not the case. If one continues reading they will see that.

Next Breeden and Ward discuss marijuana and government. Scripture clearly teaches that Christians are to submit to government as long as government is not out right rebelling against God’s Word. In this section the authors build a Biblical argument for government being part of God’s good creation and how Christians are to act towards government. So before one can consider if marijuana is right or wrong for medical or recreational use, they must first submit to the laws their government has put in place. For us the US, we are in a strange spot. Some states have legalized the use of marijuana but at a federal level the use of marijuana is still illegal (page 31). With this being the case, Breeden and Ward correctly state that “as of this writing, for any Christian, anywhere in the United States, to smoke pot is to resist the governing authorities. It is, in unmistakable terms, to resist God” (page 32).

What about using marijuana for medical purposes? This is where the discussion goes next. Unlike the other chapters, the authors are less strong in stating their stance here. I believe they do this wisely because there is much we still don’t know about the issue of medical marijuana. But what they do argue in this chapter is that if marijuana can be used for medical purposes, the fact that it is commonly used for evil shouldn’t keep us from using it in medically. Again, this may be a hint as to the authors convictions on this issue but they never state it much more than that in this chapter. They also use this chapter to show the reader that medicine is a gift and tool that God often uses to heal. Christians shouldn’t reject the use of medicine but should accept it as a gift and tool that God uses.

Breeden and Ward finish up their discussion with tackling the biggest question that comes up with this issue – since the Bible allows Christians to drink but not get drunk, can’t Christians smoke pot and just not get high? Before answering that question the authors spend the first part of the chapter dealing with what the Bible says about drinking alcohol. They do an excellent job of using Scripture to argue that drinking alcohol isn’t a sin but getting drunk clearly is a sin. It’s important to note that the authors themselves stand on different sides of the drinking issue but agree with the statement above. One author drinks in moderation while the other chooses not to drink at all (page 56). After this, the authors move to showing the reader how marijuana is actually very different from alcohol. One cannot use the Biblical argument for alcohol for marijuana. One can drink without getting drunk. However, very little marijuana gets you high. One can drink without the goal of getting drunk but it seems that getting high is really the only goal in doing marijuana. Breeden and Ward correctly state what I believe is the Biblical stance against recreational use of marijuana: “It is sinful to get high for the same reasons it is to get drunk. Being high lowers inhibitions, clouds decision making, and deprives people of fruitfulness in their work. Alcohol and marijuana share this danger. So we can conclude that the Bible forbids getting high just as it condemns drunkenness. Smoking marijuana recreationally in order to get high is sinful” (page 72).

This book is extremely Biblical based and gives solid content in regards to marijuana use. As marijuana use becomes even more popular (and probably more legal in the future) Christians need to know how to address it with a clear understanding of what Scripture says. I would recommend this book to all Christians, but especially those in pastoral ministry (this book will be a great resource as you teach and disciple your people).

Walking with God Through Pain and Suffering (Part 3)

walking-with-god-through-pain-suffering-social-mediaSo far in this series I have talked about what the Bible teaches about pain and suffering (post one) and some of the reasons God allows pain and suffering into our lives (post two). In this final post I want to share a few things we can hold onto and remember when we go through pain and suffering.

God promises He will always be with us. We see this promise throughout the Bible. In Deuteronomy 31:6 we see God promise His chosen people that He will always be with them and that He will never forsake them. It’s His presence that will help them be strong and courageous as they move forward. In Psalm 23:4 David says he can walk through the valley of the shadow of death and not fear because God is with Him. As you move into the New Testament we see that Jesus’ name Emmanuel actually means “God with us” (Matthew 1:23). The very coming of Jesus is a reminder that God is near to us. He came to us. Then in 1 Corinthians 6:19 we are reminded that even now as Christians we have God in us through the indwelling Holy Spirit. God promises to always be with us. His constant, real, and powerful presence is something we must hold onto and remember during times of pain and suffering.

God understands our pain and suffering. The second truth we can hold onto when we go through pain and suffering is the fact that God Himself understands how we feel because He Himself went through pain and suffering Himself. He entered into this world of pain and suffering and suffered through it. This is a teaching that’s unique to Christianity. Christianity not only gives us a God who is above our pain and suffering but a God who entered into our pain and suffering. He willingly puts Himself through it and knows how it feels. Don Carson says, “The God on whom we rely knows what suffering is all about, not merely in the way that God knows everything, but by experience.” God’s Word reminds us of this powerful truth as well in Hebrews 4:15 (ESV), which says, ““For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.” When we go through times of pain and suffering we can run to our Savior because He understands how we feels.

God will end pain and suffering one day. For Christians, the pain and suffering we face on this earth will one day end. There is coming a day when the curse of sin will be lifted and this earth will be made new. One of the amazing things about that coming day is that pain and suffering will be done away with. Speaking about this coming day, John says in Revelation 21:4 (ESV) that “He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.” Christians can look forward to this day and have hope.

Below is the sermon where I preached much of the content above. I hope this series of posts has encouraged you and helped you.

Books I’ve Read Recently

WeCannotBeSlient-webWe Cannot Be Silent by Albert Mohler. When it comes to being informed and educated about what’s happening in modern culture from a Christian perspective, Mohler is a guy we should listen to (check out his podcast called “The Briefing.”) In this book, Mohler speaks to the sexuality issue we have in our country today. He shares about how the sexual revolution has unfolded over the years and how we, as Christians, should respond. Mohler does an excellent job at tracing the history of the sexual revolution all the way up until current day. In the process he address everything from the homosexuality movement, same-sex marriage, the transgender revolution, and the breakdown of marriage. He caps this discussion off with chapters on Biblical sex, religious liberty, what the church should do, and the hard questions we must face and answer. Throughout this book Mohler is extremely researched, Biblical, and challenging. My favorite part of this book was the chapter on how the sexual revolution didn’t begin with same-sex marriage (chapter 2). In this chapter, Mohler points out, “Opposition to the Christian understanding of sex and marriage did not begin with the arrival of same-sex marriage. Long before those in same-sex relationships had any realistic hope for legal recognition of their unions, heterosexuals in the modern age seemed to be accomplishing the weakening and structural compromise of marriage all on their own” (page 17). Throughout this chapter he argues, “The eclipse of marriage in the last century must take into account four massive developments: birth control and contraception, divorce, advanced reproductive technologies, and cohabitation” (page 17).

41eMBHV46BL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Soul Detox by Craig Groeschel. This is an older book  by Groeschel that has been on my shelve for a good while. I’ve always enjoyed his books so thought it was time to give it a read. In this book Groeschel challenges Christians to pursue holiness in a very unholy world. He uses the idea of “detox” to describe how Christians need to evaluate how they are living and how the world around them is influencing them. He calls Christians to not stay there but to turn from those things and pursue living the way God wants and tells us to. Each chapter is geared towards a certain negative behavior, emotion, or influence.. He address things like hidden sins, bitterness, envy, anger, fear, materialism, and bad relationships. Each chapter is very practical and Biblical. Groeschel does a great job at explaining what the Bible says about each of these things and what Christians should do in response. My favorite part of this book was the chapter on envy (chapter 6). Through it, God gave me a better picture of what envy is and revealed in me some roots of envy. It was a very challenged chapter that helped me grow.

Walking-with-GodWalking with God Through Pain and Suffering by Tim Keller. I picked this book up to read while my wife was in the hospital and had to have emergency surgery due to an infection. It was a very painful and emotional few weeks. You can click here to read her story. Our lead pastor, Joe Coffey, recommended this book to the staff a while back. It wasn’t until my wife started her ordeal that I realized it was time to give it a read. Through it God did some work on my heart. He showed me more about what He says in His Word about pain and suffering and showed me how I should walk through it. Like most Keller books, it has both an academic feel as well as a very practical feel. Throughout the book, Keller uses the idea of a “furnace” to describe going through pain and suffering (he spends a good amount of time using the fiery furnace story in Daniel 3 as a parallel for walking with God through pain and suffering). The first section of the book his more academic and explains different secular views of suffering, the Christian view, and the problem of evil. The second and third parts of the book deal more with how Christians can prepare and walk through suffering when it comes into their lives. This book ministered to me a very deep way when I was walking through some pain and suffering. I would encourage everyone, Christian or not, to take the time to read this book. We will all face pain and suffering in our lives. This book will help you as it will ultimately point you to the One who will help you.

Another book I read that I decided not to review was How to Study the Bible by John MacArthur. I went through this little book with my student leadership team and it was great. It gave me a good refresher in understanding what the Bible is and how we should study it. I would highly recommend this book to new believers or Christians who have not started reading and studying the Bible on their own.

Books I’ve Recently Read

51VQyOca-kL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Respectable Sin by Jerry Bridges. One of the authors God has used to shape my spiritual life is Jerry Bridges. His book Pursuit of Holiness was huge in helping me understand personal holiness.  His other writings have helped me as well grow in my understanding and love for the Lord. Recently I picked up a copy of his book Respectable Sins. In this book, Bridges walks through various sins we as Christians tend to see as not that big of a deal. These are sins we often overlook in light of the “big” sins we see in the world around us. Bridges calls these sins we don’t take seriously and often overlook “respectable sins.” Some of the sins he deals with are anxiety, pride, discontentment, unthankfulness, anger, and judgmentalism. There are several other sins he covers in this book. What I loved about this book was how Bridges didn’t hold back in addressing the seriousness of each of these sins. He shows the reader what God says about these things from His Word. However, Bridges doesn’t stop there. He helps the reader understand how they can fight each sin in very practical ways. I’d encourage every Christian to read this book and allow God to use it to expose overlooked sins in their life.

Heaven_2015_update_with_over_1_million_sold__73625.1427149103.300.400Heaven by Randy Alcorn. This book has been on my list for a few years. I wish I would have read it earlier because after reading it I was amazed at how many misconceptions I had about heaven. As Christians, we all believe in heaven and know the Bible talks about it but often we just don’t have a really good picture of what heaven is and what it will be like. I was one of those  Christians. In this book, Alcorn helps us understand what heaven is and what it will be like. He spends some time dealing with the intermediate heaven (where believers now go when they die) and then the majority of the book deals with the new earth, which we commonly call heaven (where all believers will spend eternity). Alcorn deals with the theology of heaven, common questions people ask about heaven, and how we should live in light of heaven. What I loved about this book was how detailed Alcorn was in explaining heaven and what the Bible says. He doesn’t leave any stone unturned. He backs up everything he says with Scripture and careful study of it. One of the big things Alcorn helps the reader see in this book is that heaven is not some mystical place above the clouds where we will spend forever as disembodied spirits. In fact, heaven (or better yet the “new earth”) will be a physical place where we will spend forever with our Lord in resurrected bodies. The new earth is much like the present earth but with the curse lifted and the physical presence of God. The new earth (or heaven) will be a restoration of how things were before the curse, how things were meant to be. This book did two big things for me. First, it removed many misconceptions I had about heaven. Second, it gave me a clear picture of what heaven will be like, which created in me a fresh desire for it. I believe every Christian should read this book. It will give you a fresh view and desire for our eternal home.

51wjG9qHY9L._AC_UL320_SR212,320_Four Views on the Book of Revelation by Various Authors. Revelation is one of the most interesting and debated books in the Bible. When it comes to interpreting the book of Revelation, there are various views. In this book, four major views of discussed: preterist, idealist, progressive dispensational, and classic dispensational. Each view is explained and defended by someone who holds to that view. No matter where you fall on the interpretation of Revelation, this book will help you understand each view and why people hold to that view. In summary, the preterist view sees Revelation has been historical (the events already happened, specifically with the fall of Jerusalem in 70 A.D.), the idealist view sees Revelation has being a “spiritualized picture” of the ongoing fight between good and evil, the progressive dispensational view sees the events of Revelation happening in the future and doesn’t hold to much of a distinction between Israel and the church, and the classic dispensational view sees the events of Revelation happening in the future but sees a clear distinction between Israel and the church (their view would see most of the events of Revelation being centered around Israel, since the church would be raptured before the tribulation). I was familiar with a few of these views before reading this book but after reading it I learned a lot about the other views. This book help me to see the strengths and weaknesses of each view.

Another book I recently read but chose not to review is Onward by Russell Moore. I am currently reading We Cannot Be Silent by Albert Mohler and Soul Detox by Craig Groeshel.