Books I’ve Read Recently

553494Reading the Bible Supernaturally by John Piper. This is one of the best books I have ever read on the topic of the nature of Scripture. In this book Piper helps the reader understand the goal of reading the Bible as well as how to go about reading the Bible. I walked away from this book with a deeper appreciation for the supernatural nature of the Scriptures as well a better understand of how I should go about reading it the way God wants me to. In typical Piper fashion this book is extremely thorough and will take some time for the average reader to work their way through it. As in all of Piper’s writing and teaching his aim is for Christians to deeply savor and treasure Christ. In this book he does just that through encouraging faithful and God-honoring Bible reading.

41p+IdriMOL._SX347_BO1,204,203,200_A New Kind of Leader by Reggie Joiner. This is a little book that packs a big punch. In this book Joiner encourages leaders to lead and minister in such a way that impacts the faith (both now and in the future) of the younger generation in the church. He walks through a few phrases that should characterize leaders who want to impact the younger generation: kids matter, strategy matters, your church matters, every family matters, the truth matters, doing good matters, and this week matters. I’d encourage anyone who finds themselves ministering to younger generations (especially within the local church) to read this book.

41XjX9xTyBL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_The New City Catechism (Devotional) by Various Authors. I’ve always been interested in working through a catechism personally as well as with others. This devotional helped me do just that as I used it during my own personal time with the Lord. The devotional is based off The New City Catechism, which is broken down into a series of 52 questions and answers. This devotional makes each of those questions/answers a daily devotional that contains Scripture, short section from a modern evangelical leader, as well as another short section from historical church leaders. I found this devotional very challenging as well as refreshing for my faith.

Another book I recently read that I chose not to review was Abide in Christ by Andrew Murray. I’m currently reading Pleasing People by Lou Priolo and Kingdom Come by Sam Storms.

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Sermon – The Power of God

Throughout the book of Acts you see the power of God on display. One of the places you see this power on display very clearly is in chapter 19 as Paul ministers in Ephesus. Recently I had the opportunity to preach from this chapter during our Sunday morning worship services. Below is that sermon. I hope it’s a blessing and challenge to you.

Books I’ve Read Recently

412glbtjnrl-_sx326_bo1204203200_On Preaching by H.B. Charles, Jr. I always enjoy reading books on preaching. This was one of my favorites because of all the practical insights it includes. It’s a short book that includes very short chapters. Each chapter covers something in regards to preaching. It feels almost like sitting at a coffee shop with a seasoned preacher who is sharing all the wisdom he has about preaching with you. I enjoyed every chapter of this little book. I’d encouraged anyone who is involved in preaching ministry to read this book. No matter if you’re a beginner or have been preaching for many years, this book will encourage and sharpen your skills.

407250Erasing Hell by Francis Chan and Preston Sprinkle. This is one of those books that have been on my list for a long time. Because I am doing a series with our students on what happens after we die, which includes a sermon on hell, I decided to pick this book up and give it a read. Chan and Sprinkle do a great job at addressing the topic of hell from a Biblical point of view. This book almost serves as a short survey of what the Bible teaches on hell. Believers, and non-believers, would do well to read this book. It brings the reader face to face with the reality of hell and what the Bible says about it. There was much I enjoyed about this book but my favorite parts where the short survey of universalism (chapter one) and two chapters on what Jesus and His early followers believed about hell (chapter two and three).

51g97t4vywl-_sx370_bo1204203200_The Top Ten Leadership Commandments by Hans Finzel. The Bible is full of great leaders that God used to do amazing things. One of those great leaders was Moses. In this book, Finzel looks at the life and leadership of Moses and pulls out ten “leadership commandments” that leaders should follow. I enjoyed Finzel’s Biblical approach to leadership in this book as well as how he helped the reader understand how they can apply these lessons to their own leadership. Mixed in with all of this was many examples and illustrations from Finzel’s own leadership journey. This wasn’t one of the best leadership books I have read but it was encouraging and helpful.

What I Teach My Students About Alcohol

img_0706A few weeks ago I took a few minutes in one of my talks to address our students about drinking alcohol. We were in a series on Noah and was covering the passage where we read about Noah getting drunk. I used this as an opportunity to help them see what the Bible says about alcohol.

I wanted to communicate three important things in regards to what the Bible says about alcohol. There was plenty more I could have said but I believe these three points give students a good foundation with what the Bible says about alcohol.

Alcohol is a gift from God that can be enjoyed. To anyone who believes drinking is a sin this statement may come as a shock. But the Bible is clear, alcohol is actually a gift from God. Psalm 104:14-15 (ESV) the Bible says, “You cause the grass to grow for the livestock and plants for man to cultivate, that he may bring forth food from the earth and wine to gladden the heart of man, oil to make his face shine and bread to strengthen man’s heart.” I want my students to see that alcohol, just like any other beverage, is a gift from God that we can enjoy. However, there are certain things about alcohol to keep in mind even though it’s a gift from God. First, we are expected as Christians to obey the law. The law says someone can’t drink until they are 21. To drink before that age is breaking the law, which is sin. Second, there are times when drinking may not be wise. So even though it’s a gift from God, it’s a gift we must use properly and in the right way. Like any gift from God, alcohol can be abused which leads us to the next point.

Drinking alcohol to the point of getting drunk is a sin. The Bible doesn’t condemn drinking. That’s something we have the freedom to enjoy wisely. However, the Bible clearly condemns drunkenness. Ephesians 5:18 (ESV) begins with saying “And do not get drunk with wine.” Clearly getting drunk is a sin. I don’t want to teach my students drinking is a sin because the Bible doesn’t teach that. However, I do want to teach them getting drunk is a sin because the Bible clearly teaches that. It’s important to not only teach students getting drunk is a sin, but we need to teach them why it’s a sin. This leads us to the next point.

Getting drunk is a sin because you are allowing something else other than God to control you. When someone gets drunk they are under the control of that alcohol. That’s why people act a different way when they get drunk. The alcohol is controlling their emotions and behavior. As a Christian, we should never be in the spot where something other than the Holy Spirit is controlling us. Ephesians 5:18 (ESV) goes on to say “And do not get drunk with wine, for that is debauchery, but be filled with the Spirit.” The Holy Spirit is to always be controlling us, not something else. I want my students to understand the “why” behind the Biblical teaching that getting drunk is a sin.

If you want to listen to the portion of my talk where I covered this content with my students watch the video below. You can skip to 4:38 to pick up where I started talking about what the Bible says about alcohol.

A few years ago I posted another post here on my site about alcohol and teenagers that gained a lot of attention. Click here to check that post out.

Walking with God Through Pain and Suffering (Part 3)

walking-with-god-through-pain-suffering-social-mediaSo far in this series I have talked about what the Bible teaches about pain and suffering (post one) and some of the reasons God allows pain and suffering into our lives (post two). In this final post I want to share a few things we can hold onto and remember when we go through pain and suffering.

God promises He will always be with us. We see this promise throughout the Bible. In Deuteronomy 31:6 we see God promise His chosen people that He will always be with them and that He will never forsake them. It’s His presence that will help them be strong and courageous as they move forward. In Psalm 23:4 David says he can walk through the valley of the shadow of death and not fear because God is with Him. As you move into the New Testament we see that Jesus’ name Emmanuel actually means “God with us” (Matthew 1:23). The very coming of Jesus is a reminder that God is near to us. He came to us. Then in 1 Corinthians 6:19 we are reminded that even now as Christians we have God in us through the indwelling Holy Spirit. God promises to always be with us. His constant, real, and powerful presence is something we must hold onto and remember during times of pain and suffering.

God understands our pain and suffering. The second truth we can hold onto when we go through pain and suffering is the fact that God Himself understands how we feel because He Himself went through pain and suffering Himself. He entered into this world of pain and suffering and suffered through it. This is a teaching that’s unique to Christianity. Christianity not only gives us a God who is above our pain and suffering but a God who entered into our pain and suffering. He willingly puts Himself through it and knows how it feels. Don Carson says, “The God on whom we rely knows what suffering is all about, not merely in the way that God knows everything, but by experience.” God’s Word reminds us of this powerful truth as well in Hebrews 4:15 (ESV), which says, ““For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.” When we go through times of pain and suffering we can run to our Savior because He understands how we feels.

God will end pain and suffering one day. For Christians, the pain and suffering we face on this earth will one day end. There is coming a day when the curse of sin will be lifted and this earth will be made new. One of the amazing things about that coming day is that pain and suffering will be done away with. Speaking about this coming day, John says in Revelation 21:4 (ESV) that “He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.” Christians can look forward to this day and have hope.

Below is the sermon where I preached much of the content above. I hope this series of posts has encouraged you and helped you.