Book Review: The Prayer That Turns the World Upside Down by Albert Mohler

_240_360_Book.2481.coverThere isn’t a shortage of books on prayer. It’s safe to say prayer is one of the most popular topics among Christians books (as it should be). In his book The Prayer That Turns the World Update Down, Albert Mohler writes about prayer and in particular the Lord’s Prayer found in Matthew 6. This books serves as a tool to help the reader not only understand the Lord’s Prayer but also how the model Jesus gave should impact the way they pray. Mohler goes through the Lord’s Prayer and spends a chapter on each statement or petition that Jesus made. It’s a book that includes rich theology but also practical application in regards to the Lord’s Prayer.

I’ve read my fair share of books on prayer but this is by far one of my favorites so far. It was not only one of my favorites but served as one of the most helpful in regards to shaping my view of prayer and how I go about practicing prayer in my own life. There are two things that stand out to me as to why I really liked this book. First, I liked how Mohler didn’t jump right into discussing the Lord’s Prayer but instead spent a chapter covering the section of Scripture right before the Lord’s Prayer. This section of Scripture (Matthew 6:5-8) sets up and includes important context when understanding the Lord’s Prayer. The chapter where Moheler discusses these verses is an excellent read. Second,  I really enjoyed some of the nuggets Mohler shared about the Lord’s Prayer that I have never thought about or heard taught before. For example, Mohler points out the use of “our” and “we” throughout the prayer rather than words like “me” or “I.” Mohler rightly points out how Jesus is reminding us about the corporate nature of our Christian faith. He says, “To be Christian is to be part of the church of the Lord Jesus Christ. By God’s grace we are incorporated into the body of Christ so that our most fundamental spiritual identity is not an “I” but a “we.” This runs against the grain of fallen state. It also runs against the grain of American individualism-an individualism that has spread into many sections of evangelicalism. But we must be normed by Scripture. Jesus teaches us to drop the “I” and start with “our” (page 46-47). It was little things like this throughout the book that gave me a fresh look at the Lord’s Prayer.

I’d highly recommend this book for anyone who wants to understand the Lord’s Prayer better and wants to allow the teaching of Jesus to shape the way they pray. Indeed this should be the desire of every Christian. This book is pretty short and is as a simple read but will I believe will make an impact on anyone who reads it. It will give you a fresh look at a commonly used prayer and will remind you of some of the basics of what Jesus taught in regards to prayer.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from BookLook Bloggers.

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Books I’ve Read Recently

WeCannotBeSlient-webWe Cannot Be Silent by Albert Mohler. When it comes to being informed and educated about what’s happening in modern culture from a Christian perspective, Mohler is a guy we should listen to (check out his podcast called “The Briefing.”) In this book, Mohler speaks to the sexuality issue we have in our country today. He shares about how the sexual revolution has unfolded over the years and how we, as Christians, should respond. Mohler does an excellent job at tracing the history of the sexual revolution all the way up until current day. In the process he address everything from the homosexuality movement, same-sex marriage, the transgender revolution, and the breakdown of marriage. He caps this discussion off with chapters on Biblical sex, religious liberty, what the church should do, and the hard questions we must face and answer. Throughout this book Mohler is extremely researched, Biblical, and challenging. My favorite part of this book was the chapter on how the sexual revolution didn’t begin with same-sex marriage (chapter 2). In this chapter, Mohler points out, “Opposition to the Christian understanding of sex and marriage did not begin with the arrival of same-sex marriage. Long before those in same-sex relationships had any realistic hope for legal recognition of their unions, heterosexuals in the modern age seemed to be accomplishing the weakening and structural compromise of marriage all on their own” (page 17). Throughout this chapter he argues, “The eclipse of marriage in the last century must take into account four massive developments: birth control and contraception, divorce, advanced reproductive technologies, and cohabitation” (page 17).

41eMBHV46BL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Soul Detox by Craig Groeschel. This is an older book  by Groeschel that has been on my shelve for a good while. I’ve always enjoyed his books so thought it was time to give it a read. In this book Groeschel challenges Christians to pursue holiness in a very unholy world. He uses the idea of “detox” to describe how Christians need to evaluate how they are living and how the world around them is influencing them. He calls Christians to not stay there but to turn from those things and pursue living the way God wants and tells us to. Each chapter is geared towards a certain negative behavior, emotion, or influence.. He address things like hidden sins, bitterness, envy, anger, fear, materialism, and bad relationships. Each chapter is very practical and Biblical. Groeschel does a great job at explaining what the Bible says about each of these things and what Christians should do in response. My favorite part of this book was the chapter on envy (chapter 6). Through it, God gave me a better picture of what envy is and revealed in me some roots of envy. It was a very challenged chapter that helped me grow.

Walking-with-GodWalking with God Through Pain and Suffering by Tim Keller. I picked this book up to read while my wife was in the hospital and had to have emergency surgery due to an infection. It was a very painful and emotional few weeks. You can click here to read her story. Our lead pastor, Joe Coffey, recommended this book to the staff a while back. It wasn’t until my wife started her ordeal that I realized it was time to give it a read. Through it God did some work on my heart. He showed me more about what He says in His Word about pain and suffering and showed me how I should walk through it. Like most Keller books, it has both an academic feel as well as a very practical feel. Throughout the book, Keller uses the idea of a “furnace” to describe going through pain and suffering (he spends a good amount of time using the fiery furnace story in Daniel 3 as a parallel for walking with God through pain and suffering). The first section of the book his more academic and explains different secular views of suffering, the Christian view, and the problem of evil. The second and third parts of the book deal more with how Christians can prepare and walk through suffering when it comes into their lives. This book ministered to me a very deep way when I was walking through some pain and suffering. I would encourage everyone, Christian or not, to take the time to read this book. We will all face pain and suffering in our lives. This book will help you as it will ultimately point you to the One who will help you.

Another book I read that I decided not to review was How to Study the Bible by John MacArthur. I went through this little book with my student leadership team and it was great. It gave me a good refresher in understanding what the Bible is and how we should study it. I would highly recommend this book to new believers or Christians who have not started reading and studying the Bible on their own.