Books I’ve Read Recently

51jhmpyZ8QL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_The Legacy of Luther by Various Authors. One of my favorite figures from church history is Martin Luther. He was truly a unique man that was used by God in massive ways. His life and work continues to impact the way Protestants view their faith and well as how they operate as a faith community. There hasn’t been a shortage of books written about Luther when it comes to both his life and work. This book stands among many other excellent books written about Luther. However, this book is unique in the sense that it allows the reader to take a peak into key areas of Luther’s life and work that other works tend to overlook or don’t spend much time on. For example, there are chapters in this book on Luther’s views on music and preaching, Luther’s family life, and Luther’s later years before his death (which were pretty crazy). The contributors of this book shed light on many fascinating areas of Luther’s life and work that many readers will not get the chance to learn about in other books. I wouldn’t recommend this as the “go to” book on Luther, but would certainly make it one of the top ones out there.

81pgQLuhbzLSing! by Keith and Kristyn Getty. I’ve never read a book on the sole topic of singing. This is one reason I picked up this book to read. However, what I didn’t expect was how much stuff it taught me about singing in just over a 100 pages. It’s a small book that packs a big punch. The reader will learn things like how people were created to sing as well as how we are commanded by God to sing. Readers will also learn about the importance of singing in not only the local church but also in their own personal and family life. There is even helpful bonus sections (called “bonus tracks”) that are written particularly for pastors, worship leaders, and songwriters. This is an excellent little book that I would highly recommend to Christians no matter your place in the local church community.

51jKlmGzSjL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_The Imperfect Disciple by Jared Wilson. One of my favorite authors to read is Jared Wilson. I love his Gospel-centered focus that’s wrapped in a down to earth tone that which makes for both challenging and fun reading. In this book Wilson strives to offer a discipleship manual of sorts that’s for people who “can’t get their act together.” He says, “I tend to think that a lot of ways the evangelical church teaches discipleship seem designed for people who don’t appear to really need it” (page 13). His response then is a book like this where he states: “I want to write a discipleship book for normal people” (page 14). I’d say he accomplishes that goal in this book. This is a book that offers a fresh reminder of God’s grace to people who realize they don’t follow Jesus as well as they want to or should. It’s a book that reminds them of the Gospel instead of giving them self-help action steps to follow. It offers a great reminder of what following Jesus truly means. I’d recommend this book to all Christians.

Two other books I’ve recently read that I chose not to review were The Holiness of God by R.C. Sproul and The Skinny on Communication by Jeff White.

Books I’ve Read Recently

41Lj7+G9HnL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Pleasing People by Lou Priolo. I ran across this book back in college but never took the time to read it until recently. In this book Priolo addresses an issue the majority of us struggle with – the desire to please other people. The first half of the book is dedicated to helping the reader see why this is such a problem. What many will find in this section is that even people who say “I’m not a people-pleaser” usually are to some degree. Priolo does a great job at pointing out how we all struggle with this issue to some extent. The second half of the book deals with the solution to this problem which is to be a God-pleaser. This section, and throughout the entire book really, is a call for Christ followers to be driven by the desire to please God rather than man. This is a solid book I’d encourage every Christian to read at some point.

41dlBhPCZiL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_God Space by Doug Pollock. This is by far one of the best evangelism type books I have ever read. Pollock offers us an approach to sharing the Gospel that I believe is highly effective and needed in our culture today. In this book Pollock helps us see how conversations with people open the door for us to share the Gospel. His aim is for Christian to create what he calls “God space” through intentional, spiritual conversations. This book serves as a guide to having those types of conversations. It’s extremely practical and easy to follow. I was also encouraged by the amount of stories and illustrations Pollock used to show how this method works. This is a book that will reshape how you go about sharing the Gospel. I’d encourage every Christian to take a peak into this one as well.

701142Secret Power by D.L. Moody. I’ve never read a book by Moody until this one. I enjoy reading classic books written by men and women of God who have gone before us. Like most of those books, this one didn’t disappoint. Throughout this book Moody helps the reader see how the Holy Spirit works in and through the life of the believer and the church. It almost serves as a doctrinal book on the Holy Spirit but doesn’t just stay in the “theological” realm but spends a good bit of time in the practical realm as well. Moody points us to timeless truths about the Holy Spirit that where not just needed in his day but ours as well. Readers will everything from some characteristics of the Holy Spirit to how the Holy Spirit works in our witness for Christ.

Another book I read recently that I chose not to review was Chosen by God by R.C. Sproul. I am currently reading The Holiness of God by R.C. Sproul, Kingdom Come by Sam Storms, and The Skinny on Communication by Jeff White.

Book Review: More Than a Worship Leader

41aYymFbqYL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Recently my friend and co-worker Gary Durbin wrote a book titled More Than a Worship Leader. I had the privilege of reading this book and really enjoyed it. I’m excited to review it as well as recommend it to others.

Gary breaks this book down into three main parts: off stage, on stage, and up-staged. Gary’s desire to help worship leaders grow off and on stage is evident throughout this book. I found the off stage section to very insightful and challenging. Most books on a particular area of ministry focus more on skill rather than the person. In this section Gary helps the worship leader understand that who they are off stage is vitally important. However, what they do on stage is still important. That’s where the on stage section comes in. In this section Gary does an excellent job at helping worship leaders get better at what God has called them to do week in and week out as they lead God’s people. The last section, up-staged, is a humble reminder that it’s not all about us and that’s ok. All three of these sections challenge worship leaders to do more than just get up and sing a few songs on Sunday. Leading worship is a high calling from God that should be cultivated and taken seriously.

In addition to my comments above, let me share with you a few things I really liked about this book. First, this is a book for both rookie worship leaders as well as veteran worship leaders. No matter where you are as a worship leader there is something for you in this book. It’s been encouraging to see our student worship band going through this book together. It’s huge for rookie worship leaders but shouldn’t be overlooked by those that have been in the game for a good while. Second, this is a book not just for worship leaders. Even though the focus of this book is leading worship in the context of the local church there are things found within it that is helpful for people in other areas of ministry. I’m involved in student ministry and I walked away with a ton of great and challenging insights from this book. It’s also very helpful for those in ministry that have worship leaders serving on their team like lead pastors or student pastors with volunteers or students leading worship. I’d encourage others in ministry to not look past this book just because you’r not leading worship. Third, this book is written by someone who loves Jesus, the church, and worship leaders. I don’t just say this because I work with Gary and have the privilege of being his friend. This book is written from the perspective of someone who has served in the local church for quite some time and has gained a lot of experience in the area of worship. His heart and love for Jesus, the church, and leading worship shines through the pages of this book.

I’s encourage you to grab a copy of More Than a Worship Leader on Amazon and check out more content from Gary at www.garydurbin.com.

Books I’ve Read Recently

553494Reading the Bible Supernaturally by John Piper. This is one of the best books I have ever read on the topic of the nature of Scripture. In this book Piper helps the reader understand the goal of reading the Bible as well as how to go about reading the Bible. I walked away from this book with a deeper appreciation for the supernatural nature of the Scriptures as well a better understand of how I should go about reading it the way God wants me to. In typical Piper fashion this book is extremely thorough and will take some time for the average reader to work their way through it. As in all of Piper’s writing and teaching his aim is for Christians to deeply savor and treasure Christ. In this book he does just that through encouraging faithful and God-honoring Bible reading.

41p+IdriMOL._SX347_BO1,204,203,200_A New Kind of Leader by Reggie Joiner. This is a little book that packs a big punch. In this book Joiner encourages leaders to lead and minister in such a way that impacts the faith (both now and in the future) of the younger generation in the church. He walks through a few phrases that should characterize leaders who want to impact the younger generation: kids matter, strategy matters, your church matters, every family matters, the truth matters, doing good matters, and this week matters. I’d encourage anyone who finds themselves ministering to younger generations (especially within the local church) to read this book.

41XjX9xTyBL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_The New City Catechism (Devotional) by Various Authors. I’ve always been interested in working through a catechism personally as well as with others. This devotional helped me do just that as I used it during my own personal time with the Lord. The devotional is based off The New City Catechism, which is broken down into a series of 52 questions and answers. This devotional makes each of those questions/answers a daily devotional that contains Scripture, short section from a modern evangelical leader, as well as another short section from historical church leaders. I found this devotional very challenging as well as refreshing for my faith.

Another book I recently read that I chose not to review was Abide in Christ by Andrew Murray. I’m currently reading Pleasing People by Lou Priolo and Kingdom Come by Sam Storms.

Books I’ve Read Recently

3782Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes by Randolph Richards and Brandon O’Brien. This book was one of the best books I have ever read when it comes to the topic of reading the Bible. The author’s goal in this book is to help Western readers understand how their Western context impacts the way the interpret the Bible. They point out that often we miss things (some small and some big) in Scripture that people in Eastern cultures as well as during the time when the Bible was written wouldn’t have missed. The authors chose to focus on nine major differences between Western and Eastern cultures that impact the way we read and interpret Scripture. By doing this they help the Western reader understand the Bible in the culture it was originally written. I’d highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to grow in their understanding of Scripture and how to read it well.

81pthaDM8wL._AC_UL320_SR214,320_The Self-Aware Leader by Terry Linhart. As a leader there are times you need to step back and evaluate yourself. This book was helpful to me in doing just that. As I lead others I often neglect myself and who I am as a person and a leader. I’m glad I took some time to read this book as it served as a helpful tool is evaluating myself and helping me grow. In this book Linhart helps leaders see the blind spots they often miss. He covers areas like the leader’s past, temptations, emotions, pressures, and more. In each of these areas he helps leaders see where they can go wrong but also how they can manage them well. I really liked how there was a focus on Scripture and what it says about leadership and these blind spot areas. I also liked the practical “self-check” sections inserted throughout the book to help the reader think about and apply what they are reading. I’d recommend this book to anyone who finds themselves in a leadership position.

22116686Facing Messy Stuff in the Church by Kenneth Swetland. Churches are messy because people are messy. Sin has caused major brokenness and people bring that brokenness into the church. In this book Swetland provides several case studies to help pastors and churches think about how they should deal with messy situations. Each chapter is it’s on case study and provides no instruction on what a church should or shouldn’t do. This allows the reader to think about their own situation and how they should handle in within their own church context. There are helpful questions at the end of each chapter to guide this process. The topics covered in this book through the case studies are – depression, sexual harassment, gambling, pornography, divorce, suicide, AIDS, grief, abuse, alcohol abuse, adultery, child molestation, homosexuality, miscarriage, murder, and abortion.

One other book I read recently I chose not to review was A Little Book on the Christian LifeA Little Book on the Christian Life by John Calvin.