Financial Do’s and Don’ts for Young Pastors

One of the things Bible college or seminary doesn’t teach you, is how to handle finances in ministry. I am a young pastor and money is not my thing. I either spend too much or save too much. I’m not the best with managing a budget and sometimes spend money on things that are not necessary. The good news is I’m learning. I’m learning how to save and spend when I need to. I’m learning how to manage a budget. I am doing what all young pastors should do-learn.

From that opening paragraph your probably wondering why I am writing a post on financial do’s and don’ts. I am kind of wondering the same thing, but I do believe I have some practical advice that is helping me that will also help you.

Financial Don’ts for Young Pastors

  1. Waste your budget right out of the gate.
  2. Handle all your finances on your own.
  3. Spend it on “wants” of the ministry rather than “needs” of the ministry.
  4. Spend your own personal money for your ministry when you can use your budget.

Financial Do’s for Young Pastors

  1. Pray over your budget (Ask God to use it for His will)
  2. If you need help with finances, ask!
  3. Be open and honest about your spending from your budget.

I know this list is short, but I don’t believe we need to make finances any more complicated than they already are. God gives us money and resources to use to expand His kingdom. If there is any advice that I would say rookie pastors MUST remember is this-your money and the churches money is not yours, it’s God. Let Him use it the way He sees fit and follow His leadership.

This post was originally a guest post I wrote for RookiePastor.com. Rookie Pastor is a great site for young pastors who are looking for practical resources and tips for church ministry.

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Published by

Austin McCann

Austin is the student ministries director at Redemption Chapel in Stow, OH. He has a BA from Piedmont International University in Christian Ministries with a student ministries focus. He also has Master of Arts in Religion with a Christian leadership focus from Liberty University School of Divinity. Austin enjoys reading, writing, playing basketball & golf, spending time with his wife, and sharing the Gospel with students and helping them live a Bible centered life.

5 thoughts on “Financial Do’s and Don’ts for Young Pastors”

  1. Good post Austin. I would add to your list of “don’ts” not to buy a house. I’ve seen several situations where a pastor/youth pastor buys a house and then within a year or two he takes another position, leaving him with a house to try to sell. My advice would be to either rent or lease. All of this is, of course, negated if your church has a home for the pastor or youth pastor. That’s just my two cents worth.

    Praying for you in your new ministry,
    Nathan

    1. Nathan,

      That’s a great point! Buying a house is a big deal that most young pastors don’t have the money to do and like you said, could move on to another position in a few short years. Crystal and I are living in an apartment for a few years before we even think about a house. Thanks for reading this post and dropping a comment!

      Austin

  2. I am one of those who bought and now has not been able to sale, and therefore strapped! The problem and good of buying a house is the fact that you build equity that way, it helps with credit, and you can in some cases pay a mortgage that is the same or even cheaper than your rent if you decide to rent. Now, these especially equity and credit only works if you commit and have the money to purchase and spend on the mortgage each month. The major down fall of people buying is the down payment- so hard to come up with. So, it sounds good, but if there is a slim chance of you moving, rent for sure!

    Good list Austin!

  3. I know I am probably not posting this in the right location, but Austin, I am a new youth pastor, felt like God has been calling me to do this for a few months. I could really use someone to talk to.

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